Harbor Point
       
     
 In order to demonstrate that one could build a beautiful home on the subdivision’s narrow and steep building sites, they decided to build their house as soon as the infrastructure was complete. 
       
     
 In addition, they wished to set the tone for the types of forms and materials that would be allowed. To preserve views on the uphill sites, the building heights above grade on the downhill sites were restricted. 
       
     
 The design solution included tucking the main level (containing all of the public spaces and Master suite) into the hillside and placing another level (containing Guest Bedrooms, a Rec Room and the Wine Cellar) directly below. Generous decks on both levels extend along the back side of the house, providing outdoor living spaces that engage the view.    
       
     
 The main floor features a large Great Room which is vaulted with wood beams, and is open on the view side. The Kitchen, Dining Area, and Master Suite are tucked under the adjacent shed roofs. 
       
     
 A desire for sustainability influenced decisions about materials and systems.  Much of the wood paneling was harvested from an old house that was demolished on the site, as were some of the plumbing fixtures and doors. 
       
     
 The house has a sealed crawl space and attic, spray foam insulation, and a high efficiency mechanical system. The Client’s diverse wish list was embraced by the Architect, resulting in a creative design solution that exceeded the expectations of both parties.
       
     
harbor_point_03.jpg
       
     
harbor_point_07.jpg
       
     
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Harbor Point
       
     
Harbor Point

The Architect was asked to design a retirement house on a bluff site with long views of Lake Guntersville. The client also served as the developers of the small subdivision in which they desired to build their retirement home. 

 In order to demonstrate that one could build a beautiful home on the subdivision’s narrow and steep building sites, they decided to build their house as soon as the infrastructure was complete. 
       
     

In order to demonstrate that one could build a beautiful home on the subdivision’s narrow and steep building sites, they decided to build their house as soon as the infrastructure was complete. 

 In addition, they wished to set the tone for the types of forms and materials that would be allowed. To preserve views on the uphill sites, the building heights above grade on the downhill sites were restricted. 
       
     

In addition, they wished to set the tone for the types of forms and materials that would be allowed. To preserve views on the uphill sites, the building heights above grade on the downhill sites were restricted. 

 The design solution included tucking the main level (containing all of the public spaces and Master suite) into the hillside and placing another level (containing Guest Bedrooms, a Rec Room and the Wine Cellar) directly below. Generous decks on both levels extend along the back side of the house, providing outdoor living spaces that engage the view.    
       
     

The design solution included tucking the main level (containing all of the public spaces and Master suite) into the hillside and placing another level (containing Guest Bedrooms, a Rec Room and the Wine Cellar) directly below. Generous decks on both levels extend along the back side of the house, providing outdoor living spaces that engage the view. 

 

 The main floor features a large Great Room which is vaulted with wood beams, and is open on the view side. The Kitchen, Dining Area, and Master Suite are tucked under the adjacent shed roofs. 
       
     

The main floor features a large Great Room which is vaulted with wood beams, and is open on the view side. The Kitchen, Dining Area, and Master Suite are tucked under the adjacent shed roofs. 

 A desire for sustainability influenced decisions about materials and systems.  Much of the wood paneling was harvested from an old house that was demolished on the site, as were some of the plumbing fixtures and doors. 
       
     

A desire for sustainability influenced decisions about materials and systems.  Much of the wood paneling was harvested from an old house that was demolished on the site, as were some of the plumbing fixtures and doors. 

 The house has a sealed crawl space and attic, spray foam insulation, and a high efficiency mechanical system. The Client’s diverse wish list was embraced by the Architect, resulting in a creative design solution that exceeded the expectations of both parties.
       
     

The house has a sealed crawl space and attic, spray foam insulation, and a high efficiency mechanical system. The Client’s diverse wish list was embraced by the Architect, resulting in a creative design solution that exceeded the expectations of both parties.

harbor_point_03.jpg
       
     
harbor_point_07.jpg
       
     
harbor_point_08.jpg